Bloomberg expects bitcoin to double to $20,000 this year

End of day summary - 04/01

The Dow fell 973.65, or 4.44%, to 20,943.51, the Nasdaq lost 339.52, or 4.41%, to 7,360.58, and the S&P 500 declined 114.09, or 4.41%, to 2,470.50.
The stock market retreated more than 4% to start the second quarter on Wednesday, as President Trump warned that the next two weeks will be "very painful" in terms of coronavirus fatalities. The S&P 500 (-4.4%), Dow Jones Industrial Average (-4.4%), and Nasdaq Composite (-4.4%) each fell 4.4%. The Russell 2000 underperformed with a 7.1% decline.
In COVID-19 news, The Hill reported that Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said he will sign an executive order requiring the state's residents to limit their movement outside of their homes. DeSantis has faced intense criticism for refusing to issue a stay-at-home order, the report noted.
Meanwhile, the latest data from the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering shows there are now 911,308 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 45,497 deaths due to the disease.
The coronavirus task force on Tuesday estimated that deaths attributed to COVID-19 could total 100,000-240,000 in the U.S. with daily deaths projected to peak in two weeks. To help contain the outbreak, and hopefully bring these figures down, Florida, Nevada, and Pennsylvania joined the growing list of states to issue 'stay at home' orders for 30 days.
Original assumptions made by the medical community were based on the data coming out of China, which the U.S. intelligence community said underrepresented the real number of cases and deaths in the country, according to Bloomberg. The White House's projections, based on new data being released every day, had the market worried about the social and psychological effects on the economy.

In U.S. data, ADP reported private payrolls fell "only" 27,000 in March, which was not as bad as many had forecast. However, ADP acknowledged the data don't really reflect the realities on the ground as a lot of the firings have taken place after the week that ended its survey. The ISM manufacturing index dropped 1.0 point to 49.1 in March, which was also not as bad as feared. Markit's manufacturing PMI was revised down to 48.5 in the final print for March. That was a little lower than the 49.2 flash reading for the month and down 2.2 points from February's 50.7 reading. Construction spending dropped 1.3% in February.
In China, the Caixin manufacturing PMI climbed 9.8 points to 50.1 in March, almost fully recovering from the 10.8 point drop to the record low of 40.3 in February. The better than expected bounce is in line with the surprising 16.3 point jump in the official index to 52.0.
In turn, no S&P 500 sector was spared in today's sell-off with ten sectors losing at least 3.0%, including 6.1% declines in the real estate and utilities sectors. The consumer staples sector performed relatively better with a 1.8% decline.
In M&A news, TMUS announced that it has officially completed its merger with S to create the new T-Mobile. The company also announced that with close of the merger, it has successfully completed its long-planned CEO transition from John Legere to Mike Sievert ahead of schedule.
Among the notable losers was XRX, -7.1% withdrawing its offer to acquire HPQ, -14.5%, MAR, -7.6% disclosing a data breach that affected 5.2 million customers, and M, -9.8% being removed from the S&P 500.
Shares of GM fell 7.3% after the automaker announced that it delivered 618,335 vehicles in the U.S. in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of about 7% compared to a year ago. "The industry experienced significant declines in March due to the outbreak of COVID-19," noted GM in its sales announcement. Meanwhile, FCAU reported a 10% decline in its first quarter sales to 446,768 vehicles, also noting that "the strong momentum in January and February was more than offset by the negative economic impact of the coronavirus in March." Additionally, Toyota North America (TM) reported that sales in March fell 36.9% on a volume basis and 31.8% on a daily selling rate basis year-over-year.
Among the noteworthy gainers was KGC, which rose over 11% after it said its mines continue to operate and have not materially been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. The company also withdrew guidance for fiscal 2020 in light of the outbreak. Also higher was AMRN, which surged 24.5% after Jefferies analyst Michael Yee hosted a conference call with life sciences patent lawyer Jacob Sherkow to discuss the Vascepa patent litigation. During the call, Sherkow said that he believes Amarin has a 50% chance to win an appeal and a more than 80% chance of getting an injunction.
In the oil market, the Wall Street Journal reported that Cherony7 is scheduled to meet Friday with the heads of some of the largest U.S. oil companies to discuss government measures to help the industry weather an unprecedented oil crash. The meeting is to take place at the White House and will include Trump, XOM Chief Executive Darren Woods, CVX Chief Executive Mike Wirth, OXY Chief Executive Vicki Hollub and Harold Hamm, executive chairman of CLR, according to the Journal.
Stocks in Asia were lower on Wednesday as a private survey showed Chinese manufacturing activity expanding slightly in March. In Japan, the Nikkei 225 led losses among the region’s major markets as it dropped 4.5% to close at 18,065.41.

Currency

The dollar advanced on Wednesday, with markets staring at what looked likely to be one of the worst economic contractions in decades as the world confronts the coronavirus pandemic. The U.S. Dollar Index rose 0.6% to 99.65, approaching yesterday's high.

Treasury

U.S. Treasuries ended the midweek session on a mixed note for the second day in a row, but shorter tenors underperformed today while longer tenors recovered yesterday's losses. The long end outperformed from the start after Treasury futures rallied overnight. That rally took place as most global equity markets faced renewed selling pressure to begin Q2. 10s and 30s built on their opening gains during the first two hours of trade, while the 2-yr note headed in the opposite direction before rallying toward its high into the close. Interestingly, the late push in the 2-yr note took place as longer tenors slipped to fresh lows.

Commodity

Gold prices firmed on Wednesday as investors sought safe-haven assets after somber U.S. economic data exacerbated fears of a economic downturn amid increasing lockdowns and other restrictions globally to combat the coronavirus pandemic.
U.S. grain and soybean futures fell in tandem with a sinking stock market on Wednesday, with wheat down more than 3% in its largest slide in more than a month after nearly two weeks of gains fueled by coronavirus grocery stockpiling. Soybeans fell more than 2%, the most in 2-1/2 weeks, and most corn contracts posted fresh life-of-contract lows as worries over burdensome supplies weighed on prices.

Crypto

Following Bitcoin’s bout of consolidation within the mid-$6,000 region, the benchmark cryptocurrency has seen a slight decline that has led it down towards the support that has been established around $6,000.

YTD

  • FAAMG + some penny stocks -18.0% YTD
  • Spoos -23.5% YTD
  • Old man -26.6% YTD
  • Russy -35.8% YTD
Summary scraped from the interweb. Took 1.20 seconds.
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End of day summary - 02/27

The Dow plunged 1190.95, or 4.42%, to 25766.64, the Nasdaq lost 414.30, or 4.61%, to 8566.48, and the S&P 500 dropped 137.63, or 4.42%, to 2978.76.

It was a frenetic day of trading action on /thewallstreet. The stock market extended its recent sell-off by more than 4% on Thursday in a volatile session, as the widening spread of the coronavirus heightened pessimism among investors. The S&P 500 dropped as much as 3.5% shortly after the open, then cut its losses to 0.6% by midday, but ultimately closed at session lows with a 4.4% decline.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average (-4.4%), Nasdaq Composite (-4.6%), and Russell 2000 (-3.5%) experienced similar price action. Each of the major indices fell into correction territory, which is often defined as a decline of at least 10% from a recent high, and today's drop sent the S&P 500 well below its 200-day moving average (3046.58) amid heavy selling into the close.
From a sector perspective, all 11 S&P 500 sectors fell between 3.3% (health care) and 5.6% (real estate). Other notable moves included WTI crude falling 3.0% to 47.24/bbl to extend its weekly decline to 12.1% and the CBOE Volatility Index surging 42.1% to 39.16 in a protection trade against further equity weakness.
Regarding COVID-19, the CDC acknowledged the first coronavirus case of "unknown origin" in the U.S., which raised concerns about a community spread of the virus. California's governor fueled concerns by saying 28 people have tested positive and another 8,400 people are being monitored because of their travel.
The impact to global supply chains or consumer spending remains uncertain, but Goldman Sachs warned there could be no U.S. earnings growth in 2020 if the virus becomes widespread. MSFT -7.1%, meanwhile, was the latest high-profile company to issue a quarterly revenue warning, specifically for its More Personal Computing segment.
Current, and past, Fed officials offered their views on the matter. In an opinion piece for The Wall Street Journal, former Fed Governor Kevin Warsh argued that the Fed and other central banks should cut rates due to the coronavirus, while Chicago Fed President Evans reiterated the Fed's stance that it's still premature to provide guidance without more data.
Besides the coronavirus news, equity investors appeared to be taking cues from the Treasury market. For instance, the S&P 500's early morning low coincided with the high in the Treasury market. At session's end, the 2-yr yield declined five basis points to 1.10%, and the 10-yr yield declined basis points to 1.30%.
Not all stocks closed lower, though. Face mask company (MMM) +0.8% and Bleach company (CLX) +0.4% managed to eke out small gains amid speculation that demand for some of their products will increase due to the coronavirus.
Among the noteworthy gainers were VIR and NVAX, which surged 50% and 18%, respectively, as coronavirus fears mount. Both companies are working on coronavirus vaccines. Also higher were ETSY and SQ, which gained a respective 16% and 11% after reporting quarterly results.
Among the notable losers was TSLA, which slid 8% after Bloomberg reported registrations of new Teslas in China plunged 46% last month as the coronavirus outbreak adds to a slump in the country's car market. SPCE fell 17% after Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas downgraded the shares to Equal Weight and Credit Suisse analyst Robert Spingarn also downgraded the stock to Neutral following with the shares up 185% year-to-date.
In earnings news, BBY reported better than expected sales and earnings for the fourth quarter and raised its quarterly dividend by 10%. Last night, BKNG reported "strong" Q4 results, but also cited a significant impact from the coronavirus on its forward outlook, stating that its wider than typical guidance ranges are due to "the high level of uncertainty in forecasting the coronavirus and its associated impact on the company and the travel industry generally."
In its own more optimistic coronavirus update,SBUX said it is "seeing the early signs of a recovery" in China. In a letter to employees posted on its corporate blog, Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson reported that the coffee giant now has 85% of stores open across China as it continues to assess the ongoing impact of the disease outbreak.
Elsewhere in Europe, Stoxx 600 closed 3.6% lower provisionally, officially entering correction territory as it was off more than 10% from its record high notched on Feb. 19 last year.

Currency

The U.S. Dollar Index slid 0.5% to 98.51, widening this week's loss to 0.8%.

Treasury

The Treasury market has been the epicenter of concerns about the global growth outlook, as well as the frayed psychology pertaining to the COVID-19 outbreak. The 10-yr note yield is down four basis points this morning to 1.27%, leaving it down 19 basis points on the week and 65 basis points on the year.
Today, the fed funds futures market expects that a rate cut will happen as soon as the March 18 meeting, followed by another cut in June. Treasuries briefly turned negative in midday trade but returned toward their opening levels after California Governor Gavin Newsom said that 28 people in California have tested positive for the coronavirus while more than 8,000 other people are being monitored.

Commodity

Oil prices continued their steep decline on Thursday, with U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude falling more than 5% at the low to $45.88 per barrel — a price not seen since Jan. 2019 — as fears of the coronavirus outbreak, and what it could mean for crude demand, continue to batter prices.

Crypto

Bitcoin was fighting to keep support at a key level on Feb. 27 as markets worldwide continued to suffer from fears over coronavirus.

YTD

AH News

  • BYND reports EBITDA: $9.5M (est $5.76M), Net Rev: $98.5M (est $79.8M).Sees 2020 Net Revenue: $490M To $510M (est $485.7M)

Thoughts on Corona

It is becoming abundantly clear that the spread of the coronavirus is not going to be stopped. What is not clear is the extent of the economic damage that is going to be done by its spread before the world gets comfortable with the notion that the coronavirus is debilitating, but not necessarily deadly for most sufferers.
The latter is the accepted perspective when dealing with the flu, but because COVID-19 is so new and won't reportedly have a vaccine to guard against it for some time, there is some understandable fear about contracting the virus that is prompting some extreme measures to contain it. Those measures have been detrimental to the world economy in a number of respects, which include but are not limited to shutting down supply chains, restricting travel, and preventing