Cyprus Securities and Exchange Commission (CySEC)

Be aware of this, the truth behind DX exchange

They spread multiple false information!
They say they're regulated by the EU, this is a FALSE statement. Their entity is real, but that doesn't mean the business they will offer is good. Every company can register in the MTR database, it doesn't mean it's a good business.
Nasdaq backed statement: they use the Nasdaq matching technology. They use an Nasdaq API that matches orders with each other. They have no further connection with Nasdaq.
The company behind DX exchange is SpotOption https://www.cysec.gov.cy/en-GB/entities/investment-firms/cypriot/37591/. A company that is convicted for FRAUD and forbidden in Israel. - https://www.timesofisrael.com/fbi-arrests-israeli-binary-options-ceo-as-she-disembarks-el-al-flight-at-jfk/ - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpotOption They are offering the DX exchange under the same license number!
Do your research guys the chances on a big scam are huge!
(not my research, just repost it here, because this thread was removed from the DxExchange , https://snew.notabug.io/DxExchange/comments/adghuc/be_aware_of_this_the_truth_behind_dx_exchange/)
submitted by arianashares to ethtrader [link] [comments]

A LOT of red flags: why I wouldn't touch DX.exchange with a 10-ft pole

DX.exchange sounds pretty cool. Who wouldn't want tokenized stocks? Hell, maybe one day I could even use them as collateral for a MakerDAO CDP, right?
I had an open mind when I started poking around DX.exchange. I like the idea. I want a project like this to succeed. Hell, they even got media coverage from CNBC and Bloomberg so they must be legit, right?

But its full of red flags. Here's a TL/DR:
Obscure legal structure
I get that sometimes crypto businesses need to use unusual legal structures to stay compliant but theirs is particularly weird. On their website it states that stocks come from "Market Place Securities MPS Ltd,Cyprus Investment firm regulated by CySEC" and DX is registered in Estonia. All of the employees are based in Israel except their CEO who is based in London.
So if something goes wrong and you want to take legal action... Well good luck as they're distributed into at least 4 different countries. (This isn't what we meant when we said we want decentralization.)

Fudging information about the number of employees
The About Us section on their website claims they have "over 70 R&D engineers". So I went to their LinkedIn page to verify that figure: screenshot. As you can see, they have only 32 employees including very few engineers. Most appear to be marketing people. Almost all of the employees are based in Israel. Not Estonia or Cyprus. Many of them don't even reference DX.exchange as their primary job.

'Digital stocks' traded on DX are issued by MPS, which used to be SpotOption, a company banned from operating Binary options trading in Israel that was raided by the FBI.
Another redditor pointed this out a few days ago. If you look closely on their website, it states "Digital Stocks are provided by Market Place Securities MPS Ltd,Cyprus Investment firm regulated by CySEC, license number 170/12. " Here's the corresponding page on CySEC's website. You'll see that MPS used to be SpotOption but changed their name.
When this was brought up about a week ago, a representative of DX replied:
Dx.Exchange is not associated to SpotOption in any way.
In our Israeli branch we have hired some former spotoption employees, but also hired many more from the banking industry and online industry in all our business divisions.
...
In regards to MPS Marketplace Technologies ltd., it is our understanding that MPS has done an agreement with the defunct Spotoption group to obtain their market maker license. We have done our due diligence and found MPS comply with all regulations, therefore we were comfortable forming the partnership with MPS.
So let's unpack that: MPS technologies used to be SpotOption. DX claims the only link between SpotOption and DX is that MPS 'obtained' a market maker license from Spotoption (as opposed to getting their own market maker license...). Oh, and DX hired some SpotOption employees.
Interestingly, when I looked up DX employees on LinkedIn, the CEO of 'MPS Exchange' showed up, and apparently before he was CEO of MPS Exchange, he was CEO of 'Spot Capital', another company in Cyprus with a name that is surprisingly similar to 'SpotOptions'.
Also, MPS' website, mps.exchange is using the same DDoS mitigation as DX.exchange: Whois for MPS. Whois for DX and both used Domain Privacy Protection which is fine for your personal blog. Not so fine for a cryptocurrency exchange.
All of that is circumstantial evidence, but it sure is piling on. I'm sure that beyond the things I found here, there's absolutely no links between all of these companies. /s
Major security breach
Dan Goodin at Ars Technica is a reputable tech/security journalist. In this article about DX.exchange he writes:
When [a whistleblower's] browser sent DX.Exchange a request, it included an extremely long string of characters, called an authentication token, which is supposed to be a secret the site requires when a user accesses her account. For some unexplained reason, DX.Exchange was sending responses that, while valid, included all kinds of extraneous data. When the trader sifted through the mess, he found that the responses DX.Exchange was sending to his browser contained a wealth of sensitive data, including other users’ authentication tokens and password-reset links.
...
anyone with possession of a token can gain unauthorized access to an affected account...
Data and funds were at risk. I'd call that a major security breach. It's also quite possible that someone other than the whistleblower has stockpiled all that data. Per Dan Goodin, it's also probable that administrator credentials got leaked.
Dan Goodin really ripped these guys a new one:
Ars notified DX.Exchange officials of the leak on Tuesday afternoon. Eight hours later, a member of the site’s security team responded to ask for more details. A few hours later, officials announced a site maintenance update, but even after the site came back online, the leak continued. A little after 8am Pacific Time on Wednesday, the security team member emailed to say the bug had been fixed and thanked Ars for bringing it to his attention. A brief analysis by Ars appeared to confirm the leak was plugged.
The site official offered the following statement:
The bug was immediately identified and suppressed the minute [we] received Ars Technical [sic] professional feedback. DX is in a Soft Launch, where we got some unexpected and positive mass attention from news media all over the world. Due to the high volume of interest in our platform and heavy signups, we discovered some bugs, most are fixed, few are going under examination right now. We are confident to be able to fix them all and finalize our launch in the shortest time.
Ars sent a response asking if DX.Exchange planned to reset all user tokens or passwords and to notify users that a leak exposed their names and email addresses. So far, the officials have yet to respond.
Clearly, the bug was not "immediately identified and suppressed" but rather was live for almost half a day. Goodin identifies additional security holes in his article. Read it if you're curious.
So there you have it: they're running a cryptocurrency exchange with Mt. Gox-level security. There's a massive risk to any funds you deposit there.
There's a ton more red flags that I spotted but didn't include and tbh I haven't even dug that deep yet. Also, I'd like some transparency from CNBC and Bloomberg as to how/why they publicized this obvious scam exchange.
edit: fixed screenshot and 2 links
submitted by Priest_of_Satoshi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

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